unexplained-events:

On an Island north of Siberia, frozen remains of a mammoth have been discovered with blood that is STILL liquid! The 10,000-year-old beast was found on one of the Lyakhovsky Islands in the Novosibirsk archipelago off the northern coast of Siberia. Researchers from the Northeastern Federal University in Yakutsk poked the remains with an ice pick and, incredibly, blood flowed out.

Since the temperature during excavation was -7 to -10 degrees celsius, the scientist say that “It may be assumed that the blood of mammoths had some cryoprotective properties”. How fucking awesome is that!?

SOURCE 

(via musingsofthebigboo)

mothernaturenetwork:

Why owls have ‘flat’ facesOwls stand out from other raptors in many ways, from their night time hunting habits to their stealthy silent flight. But one of the most distinguishing physical characteristics is that their faces seem to be flatter than those of hawks, eagles and other raptors. This is somewhat of an optical illusion on our part. Here’s why.

mothernaturenetwork:

Why owls have ‘flat’ faces
Owls stand out from other raptors in many ways, from their night time hunting habits to their stealthy silent flight. But one of the most distinguishing physical characteristics is that their faces seem to be flatter than those of hawks, eagles and other raptors. This is somewhat of an optical illusion on our part. Here’s why.

timelightbox:

Photo: David Chancellor—INSTITUTE
Save the Animals: David Chancellor’s Powerful Photographs of Conservation Efforts
Rhinos and elephants are being killed in the thousands, but as David Chancellor’s powerful photos attest, rangers are stepping up.

timelightbox:

Photo: David Chancellor—INSTITUTE

Save the Animals: David Chancellor’s Powerful Photographs of Conservation Efforts

Rhinos and elephants are being killed in the thousands, but as David Chancellor’s powerful photos attest, rangers are stepping up.

chongoblog:

How I feel after doing Computer Science assignments.

chongoblog:

How I feel after doing Computer Science assignments.

(via asapscience)

aboutmerpeople:

The dapper Benedict Sea Cucumberbatch
(Inspired by this Comic Con weekend)

aboutmerpeople:

The dapper Benedict Sea Cucumberbatch

(Inspired by this Comic Con weekend)

mindblowingscience:

General Mills joins climate change fight and requires pledges from suppliers too

Two months after Oxfam launched a campaign urging food and beverage companies to take stronger action to curb climate change, General Mills has promised to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in its agricultural supply chain and to advocate for government climate policy.
General Mills on Monday detailed its new policyon its website, saying: “The imperative is clear: Business, together with governments, NGOs and individuals, needs to act to reduce the human impact on climate change.”
In a news release, Oxfam praised General Mills as “the first major food and beverage company to promise to implement long-term science-based targets to cut emissions from across all of its operations and supply chains that are responsive to the goal of keeping global temperature rise below 2C.”
“It’s a major leap,” said Heather Coleman, climate change manager for Oxfam America.
With worldwide revenues of $17.9m, Minnesota-based General Mills makes and sells food under such brands as Cheerios, Green Giant, Nature Valley, Pillsbury, Betty Crocker and Progressive.The next target for the activists is Kellogg’s, General Mills’ cereal-aisle rival, whose climate commitments so far have been more modest. Kellogg’s didn’t immediate respond to a request for comment.
What’s noteworthy about General Mills’ new policy is its sweeping nature, as well as the company’s willingness to get involved politically.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

General Mills joins climate change fight and requires pledges from suppliers too

Two months after Oxfam launched a campaign urging food and beverage companies to take stronger action to curb climate change, General Mills has promised to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in its agricultural supply chain and to advocate for government climate policy.

General Mills on Monday detailed its new policyon its website, saying: “The imperative is clear: Business, together with governments, NGOs and individuals, needs to act to reduce the human impact on climate change.”

In a news release, Oxfam praised General Mills as “the first major food and beverage company to promise to implement long-term science-based targets to cut emissions from across all of its operations and supply chains that are responsive to the goal of keeping global temperature rise below 2C.

“It’s a major leap,” said Heather Coleman, climate change manager for Oxfam America.

With worldwide revenues of $17.9m, Minnesota-based General Mills makes and sells food under such brands as Cheerios, Green Giant, Nature Valley, Pillsbury, Betty Crocker and Progressive.The next target for the activists is Kellogg’s, General Mills’ cereal-aisle rival, whose climate commitments so far have been more modest. Kellogg’s didn’t immediate respond to a request for comment.

What’s noteworthy about General Mills’ new policy is its sweeping nature, as well as the company’s willingness to get involved politically.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Elephants Have 2,000 Genes for Smell—Most Ever Found

Posted by Christine Dell’Amore of National Geographic in Weird & Wild on July 22, 2014
We’ve long known that African elephants have a great sense of smell—but a new study shows that the large mammals have truly superior schnozzes.
Compared with 13 other mammal species studied, African elephants have the most genes related to smell: 2,000.
That’s the most ever discovered in an animal—more than twice the number of olfactory genes in domestic dogs and five times more than in humans, who have about 400, according to research published July 22 in the journal Genome Research. The previous record-holder was rats, which have about 1,200 genes dedicated to smell.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Elephants Have 2,000 Genes for Smell—Most Ever Found

Posted by Christine Dell’Amore of National Geographic in Weird & Wild on July 22, 2014

We’ve long known that African elephants have a great sense of smell—but a new study shows that the large mammals have truly superior schnozzes.

Compared with 13 other mammal species studied, African elephants have the most genes related to smell: 2,000.

That’s the most ever discovered in an animal—more than twice the number of olfactory genes in domestic dogs and five times more than in humans, who have about 400, according to research published July 22 in the journal Genome ResearchThe previous record-holder was rats, which have about 1,200 genes dedicated to smell.

Continue Reading.

biomedicalephemera:

German messenger dog in gas mask
In addition to humans, all of the animals used in WWI, including horses, pigeons, dogs, and mules, had to be outfitted with at least some degree of protection from the gas attacks going on all around them.
All animals suffered from inhalation injuries from the lung irritants, but the threat to the eyes and skin of war animals was less than in humans. Horse and mule eyes were noted to show remarkable healing power, even after vesicant (i.e. mustard gas - blister gases) contamination.
Image from US Army Chemical Corps Museum, taken by unknown Entente powers soldier in France.

biomedicalephemera:

German messenger dog in gas mask

In addition to humans, all of the animals used in WWI, including horses, pigeons, dogs, and mules, had to be outfitted with at least some degree of protection from the gas attacks going on all around them.

All animals suffered from inhalation injuries from the lung irritants, but the threat to the eyes and skin of war animals was less than in humans. Horse and mule eyes were noted to show remarkable healing power, even after vesicant (i.e. mustard gas - blister gases) contamination.

Image from US Army Chemical Corps Museum, taken by unknown Entente powers soldier in France.

(via scienceyoucanlove)

Read More

asapscience:

“A large school of mobula rays fades into the waters of Baja, Mexico. “The rays were moving quite fast and it was hard enough keeping up with them from the surface, let alone diving down to take a closer look,” writes photographer Eduardo Lopez Negrete. Mobula rays are often referred to as flying rays due to their fondness for breaching.” — the 2014 National Geographic Traveller Photo ContestLet’s also keep in mind that a mobula ray can reach 17 foot (5.2 meter) wingspan and weigh over a ton. Freaky or cool? 
via Sploid

asapscience:

A large school of mobula rays fades into the waters of Baja, Mexico. “The rays were moving quite fast and it was hard enough keeping up with them from the surface, let alone diving down to take a closer look,” writes photographer Eduardo Lopez Negrete. Mobula rays are often referred to as flying rays due to their fondness for breaching.” — the 2014 National Geographic Traveller Photo Contest

Let’s also keep in mind that a mobula ray can reach 17 foot (5.2 meter) wingspan and weigh over a ton. Freaky or cool? 

via Sploid