nubbsgalore:

the wwf’s living planet report 2014, which discovered that we’ve lost half of all the world’s wildlife in the past fourty years, showed more specifically that the population of common dormice dropped by 43 percent between 1993 and 2010.

not only are dormice vulnerable to habitat loss, but they’re hesitant to cross open fields, and the grubbing out of hedgerows in recent decades has removed the wildlife corridors between woods that has allowed the dormice to move more freely to new habitat.  

dormice have very specialized diets of berries and nuts, and with less habitat they are unable to seek out enough food to fatten up before their six month hibernation (which was featured in these two posts). 

photos by (click pic) andrea zampatti, richard austin xmiroslav hlávkobengt lundberg, david kjaer and ingo ardnt

(via we-are-star-stuff)

tangledwing:

Chinese complicit in ivory poaching and elephant deaths. So are Americans.

For the first time more elephants are dying than being born each year due to poaching, with elephant herd leaders being a special target. China may be the No. 1 ivory market, but America is No. 2.The BBC reported on August 18 that in the past four years, approximately 35,000 elephants annually have been poached for their ivory. Research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that a tipping point has been reached in elephant populations: more elephants are dying than being born. The population is in decline due to the international demand for ivory.

Photo by Gunther Wegner

tangledwing:

Chinese complicit in ivory poaching and elephant deaths. So are Americans.

For the first time more elephants are dying than being born each year due to poaching, with elephant herd leaders being a special target. China may be the No. 1 ivory market, but America is No. 2.

The BBC reported on August 18 that in the past four years, approximately 35,000 elephants annually have been poached for their ivory. Research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that a tipping point has been reached in elephant populations: more elephants are dying than being born. The population is in decline due to the international demand for ivory.

Photo by Gunther Wegner

(via dendroica)

tabletopwhale:

This month I made patterns from Youtube videos of flying animals! I marked specific points on the wing throughout one wingbeat, and drew in curves that fit all 15 points in the wingbeat loop. 

You can check out the full sized GIF here or pick up a poster for your room here.

(via scishow)

sheerdarwinism:

The WWF and the Zoological Society of London have released a new analysis that shows the earth has lost 50% of its vertebrate wildlife in the last 40 years.

This steep decline of vertebrates was calculated by analysing 10,000 populations of more than 3,000 species. The data was then used to create a ‘Living Planet Index’ (LPI), to reflect the state of all 45,000 known species of vertebrates. And the result is this - in the last 40 years, we have managed to kill 50% of all earth’s known vertebrates. And remember, this analysis didn’t include invertebrates, so the total overall loss could be much, much higher.

The fastest declines are in freshwater ecosystems, where numbers have dropped 75% since 1970. Freshwater rivers often represent the end of a system, where effluent often ends up.

The graph above shows the causes of vertebrate decline based on analysis of 3,430 species’ populations. As it stands, we are cutting down trees for soy, timber, and beef faster than they can grow. We are hunting animals faster than they can reproduce. We are pumping water out of rivers faster than rainfall can replenish them. And we are pumping out carbon faster than can be absorbed (and even then, the absorption of carbon dioxide by oceans is another issue).

The photos above show just some of the animals that have been experienced serious declines in the last 40 years. As reported by The Guardian:

David Nussbaum, chief executive of WWF-UK said: “The scale of the destruction highlighted in this report should be a wake-up call for us all. But 2015 – when the countries of the world are due to come together to agree on a new global climate agreement, as well as a set of sustainable development goals – presents us with a unique opportunity to reverse the trends.

“We all – politicians, businesses and people – have an interest, and a responsibility, to act to ensure we protect what we all value: a healthy future for both people and nature.”

(via dendroica)

(Source: lipgallagher, via thelow-cal-calzone-zone)

(Source: boywhocried-badwolf, via rotiferola)

(Source: clarieholt, via peace-love-california)

bloggingaboutplantsmostly:

ultrafacts:

Source Want more facts? Why not follow Ultrafacts

THIS IS FROM TOOLANGI FOREST ABOUT AN HOUR AWAY FROM MY HOUSE

Please DON’T BUY REFLEX PAPER

Support The Wilderness Society to continue their campaign to stop old growth logging in Victoria

Toolangi forest is one of the most carbon neutralising forests on the planet

It’s also home to lots of endangered species such as the Leadbeater Possum

This one of the largest old growth forests left and Reflex paper is behind is horrific destruction

If you want to give this forest a chance please visit The Wilderness Society’s website

(via giraffeinatree)

crotalinae:

sciencetoastudent:

kingtrinbago:

The Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread

NEED

!!

rodham-clinton:

really all you need to know about the american health care system is that there’s a popular tv series where a man turns to cooking industrial quantities of crystal meth in order to pay his hospital bills

(via thelow-cal-calzone-zone)