(Source: theoreticalpermaculture, via we-are-star-stuff)

correct representation of how I handle everything.

(Source: snoden, via thelow-cal-calzone-zone)

griseus:

4gifs:

Keep on truckin’. [video]

We all should learn from this penguin

griseus:

4gifs:

Keep on truckin’. [video]

We all should learn from this penguin

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via trynottodrown)

stupidlullabies:

image

(Source: empirestatebuilding, via themicrobiologist)

Yellowcard – Transmission Home (786 plays)

highwaytosomewhere:

i will send a transmission home to say that i’ve been out here too long alone and i want to come down now. 

crazysnix:

cindymayweather:

Everybody, smile and wave. Smile and wave.

(via thelow-cal-calzone-zone)

mentalalchemy:

defeatingexistence:

clockmocker:

A water balloon full of mercury hitting the ground (X)

SCIENCE

get out!

mentalalchemy:

defeatingexistence:

clockmocker:

A water balloon full of mercury hitting the ground (X)

SCIENCE

get out!

(via rotiferola)

reginaa-phalange:

Veto

(via hellyeah-friends)

(Source: shadowstiles, via leslie-knopes)

libutron:

Coccolithophores
Tiny coccolithophores have had a big impact on the planet over time. Though they are single-celled, these photosynthesizing organisms are enclosed in a mosaic, or cage, of microscopic plates that make many very beautiful to look at. The plates are made of calcium carbonate, which the coccoliths pull from the surrounding water. As these small organisms live and die in their trillions, they bequeath their tiny plates to the ocean floor where they form rocks such as chalk. Over geological time, coccoliths have removed significant amounts of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, helping to keep Earth cool as the sun grew hotter.
Photo and text source: ©BBC Nature

libutron:

Coccolithophores

Tiny coccolithophores have had a big impact on the planet over time. Though they are single-celled, these photosynthesizing organisms are enclosed in a mosaic, or cage, of microscopic plates that make many very beautiful to look at. The plates are made of calcium carbonate, which the coccoliths pull from the surrounding water. As these small organisms live and die in their trillions, they bequeath their tiny plates to the ocean floor where they form rocks such as chalk. Over geological time, coccoliths have removed significant amounts of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, helping to keep Earth cool as the sun grew hotter.

Photo and text source: ©BBC Nature

(via mindblowingscience)